We’ll be reading Zoë Quinn’s “Crash Override” to understand the Trump era for decades to come

In response to the recent Buzzfeed article about behind-the-scenes goings-on of Milo Yiannapoulus’ and Breitbart’s racism laundering, Washington Post journalist Philip Bump said, “An early chapter of every book documenting the Donald Trump era will be about Gamergate.”

If so, Zoë Quinn’s book Crash Override will be cited by nearly all of them as the autobiography of the person most affected by Gamergate and how she’s worked to defend everyone against online mobs since.

Continue reading We’ll be reading Zoë Quinn’s “Crash Override” to understand the Trump era for decades to come

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‘Where does the idea that “women have impossible standards for violence” come from?’

Human 1:

I’m watching Angel and women get brutalized exactly like men do all the time.

It’s the same with Buffy, and, going back in time a little bit, same with Battlestar Galactica, Kill Bill, Spartacus.

I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone claim “no violence should befall fictional women”, and yet redhats and gamergaters routinely claim that women want all the benefits and none of the disadvantages.

How did this claim come to be?

Continue reading ‘Where does the idea that “women have impossible standards for violence” come from?’

‘The last Metroid is in captivity; the galaxy is at peace’

The other day (Saturday), marked the 25th anniversary of something very special: the release of Metroid, a science-fiction action-exploration video game for the original Nintendo console.

I could talk to you about how important this was, what the gameplay and music did that was so innovative and all that, but do you really care? No, you don’t really care. And anyway, I didn’t play it when it first came out. Metroid was only available in Japan, and around that time, I was mostly focused on trying to become an embryo.

Continue reading ‘The last Metroid is in captivity; the galaxy is at peace’

So much depends upon a balding tennis ball

I’ve recently rediscovered bouncing. Tennis balls, rubber balls, golf balls, toy balls – whatever bounces and fits in my hand, I bounce it, oh how I do.

It’s one of the joys we take for granted because it’s commonly available to all, and since it’s so simple, we’re expected to outgrow it. Maybe there is a time to put away childish things, but not yet.

Continue reading So much depends upon a balding tennis ball